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  • i have the MC300.  think i need to add more of the R-134A stuff. Where exactly do i plug the coolant hose into?

    guest created 2 years, 10 months ago 1 Member · 13 Posts
  • guest

    Member
    December 21, 2016 at 12:00 am

    I have pulled the cartridge out but unsure where to connect the hose to add the coolant.

  • john

    Member
    December 21, 2016 at 3:08 pm

    I forgot to mention: refrigerant doesn’t typically start leaking out for no reason. Unless you were manually defrosting and used an icepick or other sharp tool to remove ice and punctured an evaporator coil, you probably don’t have a leak. I’d say the more likely culprit is a bad electrical component–a thermostat, probe, or other electronic control. 

     

    If I am mistaken and you do in fact have a leak, refilling the unit won’t work for very long. The refrigerant will just leak out again and put you back at square one. 

     

    My hope is that you return and tell us more about your situation. What leads you to believe the issue is a low amount of refrigerant? 

  • jeremy-martin

    Member
    December 22, 2016 at 6:37 am

    Also note that if you have a commercial unit and are not certified to do so is an OHSHA and EPA violation. Those fines result in the 10s of thousands. 

  • fixbear

    Member
    December 22, 2016 at 7:11 am

    Like to add that R134A is not a coolant. It is a chemical refrigerant that is designed to boil at a specific temperature/pressure to remove heat (energy).  It boils at atmospheric pressure and therefor has dangerous qualities like burns, sophistication, and is a form of carcinogen. It is fortunately on it’s way out and being replaced by a 200 series of refrigerant (petroleum based and flammable). Working on commercial refrigeration requires a EPA recognized license. Not having one opens you to a $25,000 fine. Removing the condenser from the unit is a cautious thing as one can cause a leak or kink a line. A tech has to have a vacuum pump and recovery equipment on site before attempting any repairs just for that reason. We also carry material to tap into a sealed system without losing and refrigerant or getting any air (non-condensibles) into the system

     

       Also be advised that automotive R134 is not the same as commercial refrigeration R134. Automotive sometimes has a lubricant added that is not compatible with ours and will cause a reaction with motor winding and plug metering systems. Automotive uses Polyoglycol oil while we use a polyoester.

  • fsully

    Member
    December 22, 2016 at 9:12 am

    If your intial assessment is to add “coolant”…….you need to call a service tech!

  • john

    Member
    December 22, 2016 at 9:36 am

    Do you have the proper tools and knowledge for this job?

    I cannot stress enough how much an untrained person should NOT attempt this.

     

    It is unlikely your unit has a port to add refrigerant. This is on purpose, so that you do not attempt it yourself.

    I have seen test units with ports added by technicians (again, for testing/training), but typically the systems are closed. 

     

    If you overcharge the unit, you can damage the compressor. That’ll cost you $234 just for the compressor. Not including whatever a tech will charge you for install, and not including whatever other parts you may need for the repair job. Beverage Air 302-676B CMPRSSR 115V 60HZ R134A 1360 B | Parts Town 

     

    If you do not bleed the lines of air (the refrigerant is in vacuum), you will damage the unit further.

     

    The gauge on the “do it yourself” car A/C refrigerant canisters won’t be helpful here, either.

     

    Any mistake will cost you many times over what you’d pay for a trained technician to come in and do this job. Do yourself a favor, save some money in the long run here and hire a trained technician to get the job done right the first time.

    I’m sure other users will agree.

     

    Edit: I called the refrigerant “coolant” once. Oops!

  • ectofix

    Member
    December 22, 2016 at 5:42 pm

    Actually found the question so comical that I didn’t know HOW to respond.

     

    We’re so NICE here.  My other forum, which also discusses commercial refrigeration and has FAR many more forum members…wouldn’t have been.

  • fixbear

    Member
    December 22, 2016 at 5:59 pm

    ahhhhhh, political correctness.

  • olivero

    Member
    December 24, 2016 at 4:39 pm

    My god.. Would have shredded this guy, they pretty much tear me to pieces when I say something stupid.

  • fixbear

    Member
    December 25, 2016 at 10:05 am

    Why agitate and turnoff someone who really doesn’t understand what we go through and thinks he can save money doing it himself. I can use the $10,000 if he does.

  • olivero

    Member
    December 27, 2016 at 3:27 pm

    Well, personal morale really, I wouldn’t want this guy to hurt himself or others, I know it only takes a minor mistake in this trade to really get hurt, loosening the gauge connections can be dangerous if you say, loose the connection on he high side and the refrigerant frost burns your hands….. Don’t ask me how I know…………………

  • fixbear

    Member
    December 27, 2016 at 5:42 pm

    Oh, I know how you know. High side of R-22 is the worst of any of the refrigerants for that. Especially before the no loss hose ends. and 72 inch hoses.

  • olivero

    Member
    December 27, 2016 at 6:53 pm

    Yup, definetley not a trade to lollygag in, its serious stuff. Then you get into the political and legal stuff and its even worse.

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