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  • APW WYOTT toaster power switches fail very often (#APW89501)

    guest created 1 year, 6 months ago 1 Member · 8 Posts
  • guest

    Member
    April 10, 2018 at 12:00 am

    I have a APW WYOTT toaster with a problem on power switches that burns very often, I replaced those switches at least 3 times but after few months of normal usage switches goes bad again, maybe the switch internal copper components are not strong enough to handle the toaster or something else. Any ideas or recommendation to fix that issue permanently??

    Thanks

  • izzygreen

    Member
    April 10, 2018 at 3:15 pm

    Change the connections on the end of the wire to a high heat tab of good quality to prevent arching which causes the switch to burn up

    You also want to make sure the toaster is being adequately ventilated, make sure you have enough clearance around the device as well as cleaning off the fan cover from any build up.

    My customers are appalled whenever I show them the fan cover; they cannot imagine how much of a build up is present.

    Good luck

     

  • ectofix

    Member
    April 10, 2018 at 5:44 pm

    Yup.  Bad connections and wiring will cook a brand new switch very quickly.  Such conditions cause resistance at the connection. 

    Resistance generates heat.  Heat destroys electrical components.  A proper visual inspection by a technician will readily these issues.

  • fixbear

    Member
    April 10, 2018 at 8:58 pm

    Guest, curious as to what model toaster you are using that switch on.  Just wanted to verify load.

     

    It is very common for high load spade terminals to get weak and oxidized from high resistance.  Once a switch burns up one has to cut back or replace not only the terminals, but often the wires.  We commonly see wires that have oxidized from the heat back over 6 inches.  Worse yet, someone replaces the spade terminals with a inferior grade not rated for the load.  These in turn never make a tight connection to the terminal and again, create resistance that creates heat.  The heat travels into the switch and back the wires causing oxidation that causes more heat. 

     

    Most  heating equipment manufacturers us a high temp high load wire with a silver coating on the copper.  The terminals are a higher grade than you can find locally unless you have a industrial electric or electronics supplier. Lastly you will need a good crisper like a Pallidin.with that correct jaw set.

  • izzygreen

    Member
    April 11, 2018 at 7:43 am

    I see this most often with hand wrapping stations, the customer will leave the unit on for the majority of the day and they don’t understand why I am replacing parts every few months.

     

    Everyone always says, but that is how we’ve done it for 20 years

     

    With the introduction of solid state components and cheaply made at that, heat is not your friend

     

  • fixbear

    Member
    April 11, 2018 at 8:36 am

    Yea, those inconel heat wires have oxidation on them before you ever get to put them in.  Finding tte silver coated terminals is not easy. Most are nickle plated.

  • guest

    Member
    April 12, 2018 at 8:22 am

    Once had a customer that every couple of weeks on a Monday would call and say the toaster would not come on.  When we got there the power switch was blown.  One day on a Friday I was working late and noticed the cleaning crew pick up the toaster and head toward the dishroom.  I followed and found the guy putting the toaster on the conveyor of the dishwasher.  Ahh!  I knew what was causing the problem. 

  • guest

    Member
    April 18, 2018 at 5:34 am

    LOL, If it fits thru the opening, you can wash it in the machine. Used to be that when something was designed, the mfg would add a “fudge factor” ie, “we need it to be so and so, add 10% to make sure”. Nowadays, many companies engineer their products for “perfect world” usage. As soon as something gets a little out of spec,….

    As said above, check the amp draw through the switch, then find out what its supposed to be. Also, spade terminals are not the best choice for higher amp draw units.

    I found a company called Modern Electrical Devices about twenty years ago. They have extra heavy electric terminals as well as silver plated ones. They might suit your needs for something better in spade terminals. I love their barrel type connectors for high amp/temp usage.

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