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  • Infrared Burners or Traditional Gas Burners

     olivero updated 1 year, 4 months ago 1 Member · 11 Posts
  • guest

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 12:00 am

    I’m looking at replacing at salamander in one of our kitchens,

     

    It’s currently using traditional burners and they wear out every couple of years so I’m thinking an infrared burner might work better in the long run.

     

    What do you guys think?

  • eritech1

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 7:05 pm

    I think they get clogged extremely quickly.

    And they r a pain in the neck to take apart wen they r all greased up. (Just like every thing else but this especially) 

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 7:36 pm

    I’m not sure what eritech1 is referring to, but I personally prefer infrared type burners.  Their performance is FAR superior to open-type burners.  If a grease source is nearby, they DO require a cleaning of their venturi every few years, but that’s not a big deal.  They certainly don’t get bent and bowed like cast iron burners do.

    Where I work we only have IR burners in about a dozen salamanders.  In my seven years here, we’ve never had to replace any.

  • eritech1

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 7:40 pm

    I haven’t worked on many that’s true. But the ones I worked on must of been really bad I guess!

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 7:52 pm

    I know what you mean by that.  However, olivero is in-house and I think he can address any problems quite handily.  In such a case, degredation of IR burner performance is easily measurable by the lack of an orange flame.  Therefore a cleaning is necessary once every few…or three or four years – will get them right again.  The alternative with the open style burners is they’ll warp and require expensive replacements in about the same amount of time.  Again – I’ve never had to replace any of my IR burners.

  • olivero

    Member
    January 1, 2019 at 8:52 am

    Okay well it sounds like it’s a good alternative, I’m not too worried about grease in that area, it’s kind of the smaller cooking line we have so I think i’ll opt for that.

     

    I haven’t dealt with any infrared equipment before, what’s important to know?

     

    Probably the most general question I could ask.

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    January 2, 2019 at 4:15 pm

    WHAT happened HERE?

    It seems that half this thread is gone…

     

     olivero, I’d done some in depth research and composed a detailed & informative post to help you shop for a new salamander.  You’d asked what model I recommend and I answered. 

     

    But…it’s GONE now.  Did you get to read it?

  • olivero

    Member
    January 2, 2019 at 4:17 pm

    No, I never saw it. I didn’t get an email notification about it either.

     

    I’m sorry to hear it’s all lost.

  • olivero

    Member
    January 2, 2019 at 4:18 pm

    No, I never saw it. I didn’t get an email notification about it either.

     

    I’m sorry to hear it’s all lost.

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    January 2, 2019 at 5:32 pm

    So, you’d asked my recommendation on a Vulcan model.  I’ll try again.

    FIRST, I wrote what distinguishes the differences between a salamander and a cheese melter.  They look nearly the same, so they can be easily confused.

     

    A cheese melter has limited shelf adjustments – which must be physically removed to adjust the cooking height.  Interior dimensions are smaller than in a salamander.  A cheese melter is limited in its cooking applications.  For instance, it might not be suitable for broiling a steak.  They’re not constructed as robust as a salamander – but are easier to repair.  The burner can be easily removed through the top.

     

    A salamander is built more robust, has greater options for cook rack height adjustment – done simply through using a spring-assisted handle.  A salamander weighs more because of the cage to support and operate the shelf.  You can broil a steak in a salamander.  Salamanders are quite a bit more difficult to repair.  The burner is more diffuclt to access and the cage mechanism may get seized up over time.

     

    Here’s a blog which explains all of that:

    https://www.katom.com/learning-center/cheese-melters-salamanders.html

     

    Here’s a Vulcan cheese melter:

    https://resources.itwfeg.com/sites/resourcecenter/vfeg/ProductDocumentation/F45425.pdf

     

    Here’s a Vulcan salamander:

    https://resources.itwfeg.com/sites/resourcecenter/vfeg/ProductDocumentation/F32548.pdf

     

    The 36″ version of each both use a 30,000 Btu IR burner.

  • olivero

    Member
    January 2, 2019 at 9:07 pm

    Thank you Ectofix, we are going to go with the 36SBI, that’s the same one I ended up deicing on so we’ll buy that and put it in.

     

    Hopefully outlasts the traditional burner style.

     

    Thank you for all your time on this, I very much appreciate it.

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