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  • Delfield 6051-S won’t start or run. Was running fine just quit power is to plugin. where to start with troubleshooting

  • guest

    Member
    August 12, 2017 at 12:00 am

    I’m using the Delfield for a fermentation chamber for home brewing. Temp control using a Inkbird 308 controller was working fine now won”t power on. Breaker not tripped and power to outlet is good. is there a fuse? wiring diagram doesn’t show anything.

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    August 12, 2017 at 2:44 pm

    What method did you use to verify the power outlet is good?

     

    If you’re confident that the outlet is live, then maybe the power isn’t getting into the unit.  Test the unit’s power cord and connections inside the unit.  Power cords or connections go bad more often than you might thing.

     

    I highly doubt that there’s a fuse in there anywhere.  If there was, Delfield would’ve included it in their parts breakdown.  I checked…and they didn’t.

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    August 12, 2017 at 2:53 pm

    Don’t know anything about that Inkbird.  Here’s you a manual on it:

    Plug and Play Temperature Controller I T C – 308 User Manual

  • plepper

    Member
    August 13, 2017 at 6:51 am

    Ill check the power cord but I don’t think that’s it, nothing changed from

    when it was working to when it quit. It wasn’t moved or unplugged. It was

    plugged into a Inkbird 308 temp controller and I think maybe the starting

    capacitor went out.

     

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  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    August 13, 2017 at 9:28 am

    What you are doing with the higher temperature control is keeping the compressor in a overload condition.  It is designed to operate below 44 degreees.  This means that the compressor overload will be constantly tripping and result in eventual arcing and failure.  Also running at the higher temperature, the machine will be short cycling. Again, compressors and motors are made for so many stars per hour. 15% would be a high rated motor. Most are 10%   So depending on how long you have had this in service,  Also the suction will never get cool enough to dissipate the heat of the compressor winding’s.  This is because the evaporator  with a cap tube system will never get saturated and allow the tail coil to get cold. The evaporator is designed to operate with a normal of 38F max and 10F as a min. This helps oil to return to the compressor.  Basically you temp conversion is set up for failure.

     

    But Let’s see if we can help you extend it for a bit.   Check that the condenser fan is running.  That would indicate you have power to the condenser.  How did you install the temp control and what amps is it rated for?   Starting amps for a compressor is 17 times full  run amps.  Obviously a controller designed to operate a relay would not last long direct wired.

     

    Next, if your controller is on the cooler supply cable,  Then the circulation fans will not be running contentiously as designed.  This is for multiple reasons.  To defrost the coil, to provider more accurate temperature sensing. to keep load evenly to temperature, And to prevent freezing.  They are also designed for minimal starts per hour.

     

    I believe you have a top mount condenser. When you pull the grill off, on the left side near the compressor will be a metal column with a single receptacle that the condensing unit is plugged into.. This would be the place to plug in your temp control,  providing it is rated for 20 amps or more.inductive.  I don’t know what brand compressor you have on this unit,  Longevity in this use will be at the limit and beyond,  so brands do matter. If a Copeland, I would expect it to go quite a while.  But if a Embargo or Danfoss, Lord help you.  Feel the compressor.  Is it hot?  If so wait and listen, and feel for a bit It may be trying to start. If you hear a hmm and a click,  The overload is tripping from a locked rotor or failed start component.  If the compressor is cool, It is either not getting power or the motor overload has failed.  The overload is inside the compressor cover and senses case temp as well as current.

     

    Let us know about the Fan and power.

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    August 13, 2017 at 9:33 am

    Took the time to look up your controller,  It’s relay is only good for 10 amps.  I imagine it’s toast with the machine in overload constantly.

  • plepper

    Member
    August 13, 2017 at 1:16 pm

    Ok I think I found the problem the black wire from the cord to the

    connector is broken. So I understand about the controller not being the

    correct way to maintain fermentation temps, is there anyway to do it

    correctly? maybe a ranco or johnston controller?

     

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  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    August 14, 2017 at 3:47 pm

    Place your temp control on top between the condenser plug and receptacle..  That way it will control the cooling at the proper point and lighten the load on your control.  If it has a adjustable cut in,  cut out range, widen it to about 7 degrees. This will help with run times and starts.

     

    Ranco makes a good electronic temp control, but they are not cheap and only available at refrigeration houses. The mechanical one are less money and are the old reliable. It  also would have to be mounted inside.

     

    On the “is there a way” question, Not really.  Commercial machines are made for multiple entrys per hour and quick recovery to working temperature.  Not like domestic that are made for once per hour. It would take a major redesign of the refrigeration system by going to a balanced expansion valve to limit suction pressure and pressure control of the system. All commercial coolers use what is called the latent heat of solidification to store energy and make for longer run times and less starts to save energy. What this means is that the evaporator gets to between 15 and 19 degrees and builds a little ice before shut off. Then the continuously running fans bring the box down to the mid thirties before the coil warms to about a ideal 36 to 38 degrees.  This insures defrosting between cycles. Because you evaporator is so big of a capacity this can’t be done at the temps you want.  That’s why most all fermenters are liquid chilled. Mixing valves and storage tanks make for a very precise control. 

     

    The only other option would be to install a suction pressure regulator, but they don’t make them small enough for this system.

  • plepper

    Member
    August 15, 2017 at 8:22 am

    So if I’m reading this correctly I should just get a residential fridge or freezer to use as a fermentation chamber. I was using a 7.1 cubic foot chest freezer before and it worked good just wanted the higher capacity without all the lifting.

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    August 15, 2017 at 8:40 am

    I understand that.  The chest freezer would run a long cycle before shut down and being so well insulated not lose and cooling.  More properly gain heat. Heat rises and cool air drops so when you open it it will be nil.  Chest freezers also have a minimal compressor. Why it takes two days for one to cool a load.

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