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  • Traulsen G20010 not cooling enough?

     fixbear updated 5 days, 16 hours ago 5 Members · 13 Posts
  • chefhenryclay

    Member
    March 25, 2020 at 2:52 pm

    I have a traulsen model G20010 refrigerator serial # T46794B07. After we started removing the food from the unit due to closure from covid 19. The unit wont hold its temperature of 39 degrees. The cabinet temp stays at around 61 degrees now. It worked fine for us 2 years straight. Everything seems to be working fine condenser fan spinning,compressor humming along etc.. I reset the temperature to make sure it was set right.

    Is there anything I can do further to remedy the cooling issue? There isn`t any hvac places open so any suggestions would be helpful. Thx.

  • olivero

    Member
    March 25, 2020 at 3:32 pm

    Sounds like it might be low on refrigerant, that’s pretty common indicators of that.

    Could also be a frozen up evaporator coil which could be caused by the evaporator fan not spinning or low refrigerant OR if the door was left open for too long.

    It could also be, but unlikely, a dirty condenser coil causing it to be unable to dissipate the heat.

    But most likely it’s low on refrigerant, which means you probably won’t be able to do much, unfortunately.

  • chefhenryclay

    Member
    March 25, 2020 at 6:53 pm

    I know a technician is needed to add 134-a refrigerant. Gauges and all the hook ups to the unit can only come from a specialist.

    Do they make refrigerant that has sealant in it. This might fix the leak if there is one? Unit is pretty old.

  • shawnforan - Dover, Tn

    Member
    March 25, 2020 at 8:43 pm

    They do make a sealant that can be added but it’s not really the best fix, but might do you for a bit since it’s an older unit. I have a McCall reach in that has done something similar and it was found to have a small leak although it used r404a. If you can, check the coils to ensure that there are no obstruction or partial obstructions from debris or ice. Other than that you will need a tech to come check it.

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    March 26, 2020 at 8:35 am

    I believe you have a top mount reach in. correct me if I’m wrong. That means you have the dual squirrel cage blower for the evaporator. And the hot gas heater in a pan next to the compressor. Commonly I have seen the blower motor not run to speed or if you have used a lot of cardboard or burlap in the cooler the blower wheels get clogged up with organic material and mold. One also sees a lot of the hot gas tubes rub or corrode and leak. Make sure that the blower runs when you hold the door switch closed.

    I don’t know about your state, but in most states repair services are exempt from the shutdown. Plumbing, electrical, and food supply are critical at this time. And one can’t keep food safe without refrigeration. So try calling again.

    As for a refrigerant sealant, They do not work. And often cause more expensive problems if used. Refrigerants are a strong solvent. R-12 would even leak though copper tubing. but at a slow enough rate that a machine could run ten years without effect. When I used to work on R 717 systems, it was always in the air. After all, ammonia is powerful to your smell. Sealants were designed for the automotive field to just get through a period to schedule a complete replacement of the system. Condenser, compressor and evaporator have to be replaced for compressor warranties in automotive. To cost prohibitive in commercial refrigeration. Plus our operating temperatures and metering devices are a far cry from automotive. Cap tubes are not like a orifice. Dryers are not like a screen. Sealants will create a problem that you will not like.

    It is not uncommon for a working cooler to be shut down and not work after setting a period for restart. Especially if it has a Schrader charge fitting on the low side. During normal operation the low side will normally never get above 40 psi. During shutdown it can be over 100 psi. depending on ambient temperature. So a slow leak that would take a year to notice will cause failure in a week. The higher pressure leaks faster.

  • chefhenryclay

    Member
    March 26, 2020 at 2:19 pm

    Thanks for the advice, blower motor and all that area is clear of blockage.

    <font face=”inherit”>Interesting to know a leaky refrigerator refrigerant gets worse when the the unit is not operating.I heard that </font>sealants<font face=”inherit”> are not good to use as well. Anyway, what is the possibility of tracking down the refrigerant leak and </font>repairing<font face=”inherit”> it? I </font>remember<font face=”inherit”> one of my A/C units had a refrigerant leak. I think the tech tracked down the leak and repaired it, using a dye.</font>

    <font face=”inherit”>Do </font>refrigerators<font face=”inherit”> have a similar item to track down a leak?</font>


    • olivero

      Member
      March 26, 2020 at 6:48 pm

      Yeah, it’s another way to do it but there’s multiple. I’ve never used dye personally, I just look for it with soap bubbles and nitrogen.

      Some people use “sniffers” to detect it, others use sonic leak detectors and listen for it, everyone has their own preference.

  • isitfridayyet

    Member
    March 27, 2020 at 4:36 pm

    I like a GOOD electronic leak detector (like the d-trek)to find a leak, then if you want to see it, use bubbles. My guess would have been a frozen evaporator from having it open to long. Depending on what controller you have, it may be able to give you some troubleshooting information. I know Traulsen used to have issues with the evaporator sensors failing and not allowing a proper defrost. That can be checked through the control.

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    March 27, 2020 at 7:47 pm

    Chef Clay, there are several methods of leak detection.

    In a large leak I use a ultrasonic detector. You can walk in the room and get a direction from it. As you approach the leak you can dial it down and actually pinpoint it to within about a inch.

    With a small to medium leak I like to start with a H10. Originally by GE but built by Fugi today and sold under the Bacharach name. My original was a H-10B, but the 110 power was a bit of a handy cap. It is capable of finding .2 oz per year leak. Today I use a H-10G that is rechargeable. They are so sensitive due to the thermo heater and vacuum pump that pumps the sensing air over the heater coil that reaches 2000F. I have not found one better, but they do cost about $400.

    Lastly is a simple thickened soap solution like used for gas install and leak testing. It works well for moderate to low leaks, but not real slow. It is also messy from all the liquid soap dripping down, so have some towels handy. Understand, that there has to be positive pressure in the system for leak testing. If a medium or low temp machine is running it can be negative pressure on the low side. Especially if under charged.

    The cheap detectors just don’t cut it for me. I’ve bough about a dozen different ones over the years. Remember that I started with the Halide leak torch as leak detection. It works great on the smaller leaks, but will extinguish the flame on the catalyst with a larger leak. It also takes years to develop the skill to read and interrupt the flame color correctly for what is happening.

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    March 27, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    I forgot to mention, That ultrasound works well with the system in a vacuum. It is the only way to find a leak without positive pressure and a bit of refigerant in the system. But it will also point you to leaking hoses and your vacuum machine. Carry a 24 inch by 24 inch foam board to block it and still be able to find your system leak.

  • isitfridayyet

    Member
    March 29, 2020 at 12:46 am

    I like the H10 G also. I’ve got one that’s almost 30 years old & still works great, although you need power to use it. The cheap ones are a waste of money and will get you in trouble if you’re doing commercial work. The customer isn’t going want to pay you a second time because you left, or missed a leak.

    • fixbear - ADK NY

      Member
      March 29, 2020 at 7:46 am

      The H10 B was the 110 version. About 12 years ago they came out with the G version. That one is self contained battery in a hard plastic box with a 1300 ma charger. The B was a leather case. I still use the B, as it is a bit more stable than the G. The G is also auto-ranging.

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    March 29, 2020 at 7:58 am

    I forgot to cover the Dye detection. It is primarily used in transport systems where one can not be at the leak. Uv dye and a black light or uv light today. Requires eye protection for the UV-C It will cause cataracts. It leaves a trace stain that you can pick up with the light and find a near source of the leak. Especially useful for intermittent leaks. But I have never been happy with the way of introducing the dye into the system. You definitely have a possibility of moisture or non condensables when adding it. That’s not a big problem with automotive systems, But a real concern with commercial.

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