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  • Which equipment repair must be left to the pros?

     outgothelights updated 1 week, 3 days ago 5 Members · 16 Posts
  • outgothelights

    Member
    May 15, 2020 at 5:24 pm

    Hi – I’m sourcing content for an article and would appreciate any ideas about which repairs REALLY must be left to professional technicians. Troubleshooting why a fryer won’t heat? Figuring out why a pilot light keeps going out? Fixing a leaking ice machine? IDK.

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    May 15, 2020 at 5:49 pm

    Equipment manufacturers pretty much spell that out in their owner/operator’s manuals. Anything beyond what’s covered in those should be done by technicians.

    WHY? Primary concerns are ALL about safety.

    • Safety of the self-proclaimed DIYer so he/she doesn’t get hurt.
    • Safety within the equipment’s function so that its MALFUNCTION doesn’t send an employee to the hospital because the equipment blew up or nearly electrocuted someone because a DIYer bypassed a SAFETY device to keep the equipment running.
    • Safety for patrons of food service establishments so as to prevent equipment from not meeting health codes and making people sick.
    • outgothelights

      Member
      May 18, 2020 at 8:36 am

      I appreciate the 360 view @ectofix — not just safety for the tech but safety for the employee and the patron too.

  • shawnforan - Dover, Tn

    Member
    May 15, 2020 at 6:27 pm

    I agree 100% woth ectofix. While there are DIYers out there that would be comfortable and have the ability to diagnose an issue with a particular piece of equipment, exceeding the manufacturers recommend user level operation and maintence puts people in danger and equipment at risk. It could also void any warranty that the equipment owner might have not to metion possible code and or insurance violations depending on the area you live in and the insurance company.

    • outgothelights

      Member
      May 18, 2020 at 8:38 am

      @Shawnforan, I didn’t realize the $$ repercussions from insurance and code violations. Clearly it goes farther than simply the fix.

  • shawnforan - Dover, Tn

    Member
    May 15, 2020 at 6:37 pm

    Might I recommend that you reach out to Dan Reese, Director of Training for CFESA. He has experiance doing investigations for this type of thing when it has gone wrong. You can reach him at the CFESA World Headquarters.


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  • olivero

    Member
    May 15, 2020 at 10:05 pm

    In a general idea. All of it should be left to pro’s.

    It’s dangerous stuff, not just for the guy fixing it, but if they fix it wrong, this equipment can blow up or electrocute people.

    I take it seriously but I take it deadly “lol” serious when it comes to the final equipment, I’ll take stupid risks sometimes but I will NEVER endanger the operator by doing hack or unsafe work.

    • outgothelights

      Member
      May 18, 2020 at 8:40 am

      @Olivero, my headspace was so about gas that I wasn’t even thinking electrocution. I’ll take a deeper dive into that area and appreciate the heads-up.

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    May 16, 2020 at 9:38 am

    When it comes to anything with refrigeration, one has to hold a EPA certification to even open it up legally. That’s to ensure that the proper recovery equipment and methods are available if something goes wrong.

    As for gas equipment, a NGA certification is required to do the same. Gas lines and parts require a certification to even buy them. And the training is specific to each brand. Yes there are a few suppliers that don’t check, but many do.

    Now with plumbing and electrical, It’s a patchwork depending on municipal codes. Some cities are very restrictive, others not so much.

    Safety and common sense is the primary here. Much of today’s food service equipment is very technical and requires serious formal training to work on them.

    • outgothelights

      Member
      May 18, 2020 at 8:41 am

      That’s super helpful @fixbear. I’m going to check out those codes/requirements and certifications for more detailed info.

  • olivero

    Member
    May 16, 2020 at 12:39 pm

    What’s this NGA thing, I can’t seem to find it.

    Is it, Northeast Gas Association?

    • fixbear - ADK NY

      Member
      May 16, 2020 at 2:46 pm

      National Gas Association

  • shawnforan - Dover, Tn

    Member
    May 16, 2020 at 2:20 pm

    NGA must be some thing specific to your area/region. We have no requirement for working on gas fired kitchen eqipment here.

  • olivero

    Member
    May 17, 2020 at 11:24 am

    Same here in Florida, at least not that i’ve heard of.

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    May 18, 2020 at 6:32 am

    The national gas code leaves the enforcement to the gas supply companies to enforce. You can find them in the NFPA gas code book. Wether it be propane, natural gas or other. They consider it a nuisance. Just like the bi-annual requirement for leak testing. When was the last time you saw them sniffing around?

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