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  • guest

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 12:00 am

    So I just commented on a post about a tool made by a manufacturer for install. Does anyone have some examples of custom tools used to install parts? My personal favorite is: APW Wyott 3023300 TOOL GREASE SEAL EXPANDER | Parts Town  No matter how many times I have told a tech to order it to make their life easier they fight it and call back and order it anyway. Saves hours of time! 

     

    -Joe 

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 11:25 am

    Made many tools for special jobs over the years. Why we had a machine shop.

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 11:36 am

    I bet that comes in handy. In-shop welders or welding capabilities are awesome. 

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 12:15 pm

    Lathes, milling machine, surface grinder, Sunnen hone and acsess to a colledge machine lab with water jet, and CNC equipment

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 12:18 pm

    Some guys just use JB weld and some duct tape. 

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 12:38 pm

    You laugh at JB weld, but in the early eighties I was hired to a shaker screen.  11 inch roller bearing with a loose fit in the housing.  Housing to thin to bore out and sleeve,  Found a outfit in England that had a special epoxy system ($2500 and that was half price) that we could prep the housing, coat the bearing with a release, mix and fill the housing around the bearing. Customer bought the kit, used it for years to repair pump shafts and housings, and scored hydraulic cylinders. Was even used in Britain to replace a broken prop blade on a 44 ft propeller that loss 1/3 of a blade. would take months to build and replace the original.

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 1:37 pm

    I don’t kid on the JB Weld man. It has saved me professionally and at home after a kid has broken something I can fix in 15 minutes. 

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 2:34 pm

    Epoxies and glues have come a long way  in the last few years.  The key is to do proper prep and design the right one for the application.  There is no one that will do it all. 

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 4:44 pm

    This one for the chain is cool. PN 9134 Chain breaker tool for Nieco 

     

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    February 23, 2017 at 5:05 pm

    That’s not a special.  Anyone that has used bulk roller chain will have at least one

  • izzygreen

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 8:04 am

    With the  new Hobart Legacy mixers there are a whole slew of custom tools needed (according to the service manuals) to service the transmission or motor

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 8:15 am

    Maybe just a pair of bolt cutters? 

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 8:31 am

    I want to see what one looks like. I have never worked on one. Do you have an example? 

  • izzygreen

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 8:33 am

    I am expecting the planetary puller any day now, I’ll upload a pic once I get it, or were you talking about the mixer itself?

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 8:40 am

    I know what the mixers look like but the special tools are what I’m interested in. I used to work at a manufacturer and I would ask the engineers, “How are they going to get to that screw?” or “How are they going to get that out?”. The look on their face after they realize they just designed a need for a special tool or even have to redesign the unit itself is priceless. 

  • john

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 9:07 am

    It’s sort of funny to read “anyone” that has used a bulk roller chain. 
    Yeah, let me just break out my Rockwell Turbo Encabulator. 

    “Turbo Encabulator” the Original – YouTube 

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 12:13 pm

    Damn, my boots aren’t that high.

  • john

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 1:28 pm

    I’m not familiar with that phrase. I was just “breaking” your chain. 
    Hope it didn’t come off the wrong way!

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 2:04 pm

    John B (Parts Town Admin) wrote:

     

    . I was just “breaking” your chain. 

    Good one.  Just my farm back round and how deep it can be.

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 3:43 pm

    It grease seal tool in action. 

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    February 24, 2017 at 3:54 pm

    The new polypac seals that have been coming in since the late eighties where developed by Parker Hannfin first for high pressure hydraulics and now for shaft seals etc. They are a big difference from the old neoprene lip seal, but are more precise and stiffer.    We used to heat them in hot water to make it easier to install inside a captive groove. Especially smaller ones.  But they do prevent any loss of oil.  Chemical engineering has come a long way.

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 27, 2017 at 9:19 am

    The funny thing is… this is just for hot dog grease… ewwwwww. 

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    February 27, 2017 at 5:39 pm

    I don’t know why I never get tired of listening to that overwrought and flamboyantly presented techno-babble.  Here’s another version I found awhile back:

     

    Rockwell Retro Encabulator

     

    My dingle-arm is worn out.  Does PartsTOWN stock that?

  • techjoeb

    Member
    February 28, 2017 at 11:19 am

    I’ll check stock… we just sold the last one! 

  • john

    Member
    February 28, 2017 at 4:00 pm

    Never tell your lady that.

    ectofix, if you like the Encabulator videos, there’s a group of (crazy?) folks on reddit who only deal in flamboyantly presented technobabble. https://www.reddit.com/r/VXJunkies/ 

    I can’t tell if real technicians would love or hate this. Maybe a bit of both. I’m curious to know your reaction.

  • alnelson

    Member
    February 28, 2017 at 9:33 pm

    That tool for compressing the lid spring on Henny Penny pressure fryers comes in pretty handy

  • john

    Member
    February 28, 2017 at 10:34 pm
  • techjoeb

    Member
    March 8, 2017 at 1:57 pm

    NIeco 9128. Shaft cleaning tool AKA The Dawg Bone. 

     

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    November 6, 2017 at 8:48 pm

    I’ll share with y’all this special tool that you would never expect.

     

    My boss had passed to us techs this rather dumb-looking ratcheting wrench put out by Crescent:

     

     

    Sorry folks.  Whether Crescent still markets this wrench is not my concern.  I DID check their website and didn’t see it there.  But…I got mine.

     

    I hope you can get one.  It’s a rarely used but very helpful tool.

  • john

    Member
    November 7, 2017 at 11:49 am

    I just had to find it. Could not resist. Searched for crescent jaw ratchet ^^

    Crescent R2 Rapid Rench 8 in. Ratcheting Socket Wrench-FR28SMP – The Home Depot 

     

    This thing looks like it could be useful for standard jobs requiring a ratchet, too. Could. 

  • fixbear - ADK NY

    Member
    November 9, 2017 at 2:41 pm

    Don’ja just love working on fryers.  Especially the filter pumps.  Only thing worse is the roof ventilators for a Chinese restaurant. Seen some with 3 inches of grease on the roof.  Ya need a lot of plastic and cardboard..

  • ectofix - Nashville

    Member
    November 9, 2017 at 10:00 pm

    You’re referring to that fine coating of grease that’s encapsulating the gas valve and fitting pictured above?  Well, former boss of mine (God rest his soul) called it “smooch”. 

     

    I have yet to find names for the many consistencies and densities that fryer grease can take on.  The same grease that’s in or on our french fries, chips, hash browns, fish, tofu, tempura, shrimp, chicken tenders…or whatever.

     

    I can only generalize it at certain levels.  Grease forms into:

    1. The stuff you can simply wash off your hands with adequate soap.
    2. >
    3. >
    4. >
    5. >
    6. The stringy glop that you CAN’T wash off your hands, despite whatever humanly safe soap you employ.
    7. >
    8. >
    9. >
    10. >Grease which only a REALLY, REALLY harsh chemical can break down.
    11. >
    12. >
    13. >
    14. >
    15. >
    16. The texture of grease which can be scraped away in sheets to resemble something almost like…SKIN (my favorite).
    17. >
    18. >
    19. >
    20. >
    21. >
    22. The rock-hard, dried-on glue version of grease which can ONLY be burned off through the application of a direct blue flame – or from behind the surface to which it adheres to (which smokes and stinks, but efforts to remove it is rehabilitative).  In the latter technique, the grease will virtually JUMP off the said surface.  This procedure is best done OUTDOORS.
    23. Of course, the next molecular state is carbon.

     

    Those of us who might be tasked in the removal of such grease will understand that the numerous “>” markers indicated above is NOT an accurate quantitative illustration of the many OTHER forms which grease may take on.  For those who HAVEN’T had the pleasure in performing the task of fryer grease removal, just put an  between #1 and #22.

  • gregct

    Member
    November 16, 2017 at 8:21 am

    Blodget’s blower wheel puller was always a time saver….   Frymaster’s Microamp to millivolt converter was indespensible, too… wish I still had one…

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