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  • What kind of a monometer to use for a Dean sr142g lp

  • guest

    Member
    October 31, 2017 at 12:00 am

    Pilot goes out when you turn valve to on

  • ectofix

    Member
    October 31, 2017 at 5:14 pm

    I’m not a poet, but this monometer works for me:

     

    Thus I

    Pass by,

    And die :

    As one

    Unknown

    And gone.

    I’m made

    A shade

    And laid

    I’th’ grave :

    These have

    My care

    Where tell

    I dwell

    Farewell.

    ( -Robert Herrick : Upon His Departure Hence)

  • ectofix

    Member
    October 31, 2017 at 5:47 pm

    I doubt that reading that to your Pitco fryer will help you, though…

     

    I DO suggest that you check your gas connection…or even the gas source.  Sounds like you have barely enough volume of gas to supply the pilot and, when you DO turn the main burner on, its demand immediately deprives the pilot of its fuel.

     

    Some causes of that?

    • A poorly connected quick-disconnect.
    • An empty propane bottle.
    • A failed pressure regulator supplying the fryer.
  • fixbear

    Member
    November 1, 2017 at 3:32 am

    Or a kinked line,  or a partially closed supply valve,  Or a plugged regulator vent.

     

    As for what kind of manometer to use,  one calibrated for water column.  There are electronic ones today that are easy to set up and use.  Or,  you can make your own with a piece of clear tubing, a board, a tape measure, some fittings,  and some water.  Get’s messy and is bulky compared to the new ones.

     

    And, if you are running it off a 20, 30 or 40 pound bottle,  The bottle connector has a filter and flow restrictor in it.  Also to get the BTU’s that a fryer has to have you need the high volume connector with the green hand nut, not black.  Also the new safety fill valves on the bottles sometimes stay closed even when connected. Turn bottle off, disconnect, reconnect, twist regulator on the rubber seal,  turn bottle on.  Allow to equalize for about 10 seconds before lighting. The valve has a safety flow shutoff if open without back pressure.

  • fixbear

    Member
    November 1, 2017 at 6:56 pm

    I forgot to mention, That if a LPG bottle with safety valve is transported on it’s side,  often the overfill valve will jam closed and not allow anything in or out.  Use a milk container for transport vertically.  Sometimes you can free it if it isn’t overfilled by a sharp blow of the tank on it’s base. In other words, pick the tank up about 3 inches and smack it down on a hard surface.  This makes the float valve inside drop and hopefully free up from it’s seat.  Only once please.  If not you will need a new tank or tank valve.

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