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  • How do i get training to learn to repair ice machines?

     guest updated 1 year, 6 months ago 1 Member · 7 Posts
  • guest

    Member
    May 15, 2017 at 12:00 am

    I live in St Croix, United States Virgin Islands , and i am interesting in learning to repair all ice machines, How do i acquire training online?

  • john

    Member
    May 15, 2017 at 10:37 am

    This thread has a lot of good information for you to check out. Food service repair training 

     

    CFESA is still the most formal training. Honestly, many techs I know merely applied and got a job at service companies, started up from there and learned on the job. I don’t personally know many HVACR people who made the lateral move to just foodservice, though that’s an option as well, I should think. 

  • ectofix

    Member
    May 15, 2017 at 6:09 pm

    I’m assuming you’re wanting training on commercial ice machines that restaurants use?

    If you’re trained and well experienced on refrigeration equipment, you’re halfway there.  If not, I’d suggest get several years of solid experience in that area first.  Otherwise, I’ll present several aspects of ice machines that are fundamental:

     

    There are different types of machines you’ll find out there, defined by what type of ice they produce:

    • Cube
    • Nugget
    • Flake
    • and various other types, depending on needs

     

    Ice machines are all about the various types of water controls and sensors they use.  Despite the broad variations in how that’s done, ALL ice machines have three basic cycles:

    • Freeze – when the ice is being made
    • Harvest – when the ice is ready to be dropped into the storage bin
    • Auto-shutoff – to stop the machine when the bin is full

     

    Those three cycles are well defined in cube machines – the most common type.  However, in nugget and flake machines, the freeze and harvest cycles are combined within a single component (the evaporator) and is a constant evolution of ice BEING produced…pushing out the ice that’s ready.

     

    Ice machine designs, particularly cube machines, vary dramatically from one manufacturer to another.  Some of the major manufacturers are:

    • Hoshizaki
    • Manitowoc
    • Scotsman
    • Follet
    • Ice-o-matic

    Those are the ones I saw the most of, but there are many others.  I suggest that you get you some technician’s handbooks for the machines you see and read them.  Hopefully there’s some “theory of operation” or operational sequence” that you can wrap your head around. 

    Here’s one from Manitowoc.  They do pretty good in describing everything that happens in their ice machine.

     

    Manitowoc Technician’s Handbook

     

    Another variable is how old a machine is.

    • Older machines use more mechanized plumbing (such as a float valve for water level in the reservoir) or electro-mechanical controls  (like a motorized timer)
    • Newer ice machines are more electronically oriented (control boards, solenoid valves, water sensing probes, digital controls, etc)

     

    Anyway, I personally don’t know of any on-line courses that would give you any consolidated training that would cover the basics.  Maybe someone else might know of something.

     

    All that I can suggest –

    To gain exposure to each manufacturers ice-making systems, contact your local refrigeration supply house to see if they host any ice machine manufacturer’s training seminars and classes.  If they do, then get you a seat.

    Fair warning that the level of training they offer varies as well.  Some manufacturers go in depth on operational theory, while others may just be offering classes for seasoned techs for familiarization on some of the new units they’re putting out.  In the latter situation, you may quickly find yourself “lost” when they begin using jargon that all the other guys already know.

  • davejohnsonnola

    Member
    May 18, 2017 at 11:41 am

    ecto as always knocking it out of the park!!

     

    Other suggestions: on Youtube search by your brand name and ice machine. Most of the manufacturers have some basic information online especially with regard to cleaning procedures. I’d wager that the majority of ice machine problems are based in lack of basic cleaning and maintenance. A fellow named Nor-Cal has quite a few well edited videos on Manitowoc and Hoshi, Jim Pettinato has some more rather lengthy but good info vids as well.

  • fixbear

    Member
    May 18, 2017 at 1:16 pm

    I have been waiting in hopes that Kieth would register to the site and provide us with a bit of backround and why he wants to repair ice machines.  Basically one need to get refrigeration training and certification/license. They also need a good basic electrical background, Hydraulics, and mechanical.  If you are a person that can rad and apply, Modern Refrigeration is a great starting point.  It is used a lot of trade schools.  Has proficiency self test’s. Available at most good refrigeration house’s. 

     

    Modern Refrigeration and Air Conditioning / Edition 19

    by Andrew D. Althouse, Carl H. Turnquist, Alfred F. Bracciano, Daniel C. Bracciano, Gloria M. Bracciano

     

    I commonly dig it out for referance even today. Although mine are like the 8th edition and 14th.  I have not seen the 19th yet, but if it covers propane,  I will be buying it.

     

       Finally, find someone to apprentice with if possible.  This will give you time to accumulate the needed equipment and tools  DVOM,  Ammeter,  digital thermometer with line clamps,  Guages, Vacume pump, recovery machine, Vacume gauge, torch set, Schrader valve changing tool, H10 leak detector, Scale, Tubing tools,  4 valve Charging manifold with no leak hoses, Valve fitting wrenches,  Potable vacuum cleaner,  Electrical stripper and crimper, and a slew of hand tools and screw drivers.

  • eowbrett

    Member
    May 21, 2017 at 6:55 am

    ecto is awesome!!!

  • guest

    Member
    May 11, 2018 at 5:11 pm

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